All coal boilers to be removed from schools

Thanks to a $10 million dollar investment, all remaining coal boilers in New Zealand schools will be replaced with renewable woody biomass or electric heating sources by 2025 reducing carbon emissions by around 35,400 tonnes over 10 years, Climate Change Minister James Shaw announced today.

The move is part of the latest allocation from the Government’s $220 million State Sector Decarbonisation Fund which supports the Carbon Neutral Government Programme, which has already achieved an emissions reduction of 422,981 tonnes of carbon over ten years – the equivalent of taking 17,400 cars off the road.

“I am delighted to announce an end to dirty coal-powered boilers in our schools. This investment means more young people will be kept warm and healthy at school, using clean, green, low-carbon energy,” said James Shaw.

“Clean energy in schools is a win for our kid’s health and the climate, and shows that what’s good for the environment is also good for New Zealanders.

“To date, the School Coal Boiler Replacement Programme has prioritised schools with the oldest and least efficient boilers, but today’s commitment is a major expansion of the programme, and means that around 180 schools with coal boilers will be in a position to prioritise the transition to clean energy.

“It’s estimated these projects will cut carbon emissions by almost 36,000 tonnes over ten years – that’s the same as taking 1400 cars off the road.

“In tackling climate change we can also change our lives, and the places we live and spend time like schools for the better – and that’s what this Government is committed to,” said James Shaw.

“Today’s announcement, shows once again that this Government means business when it comes cutting emissions and creating new job opportunities for our future generations, who will be profoundly affected by the actions we take today,” Megan Woods said.

“Our young people have been backing climate action for a long time and it makes sense that our classrooms not only act as conduits to inspire change but are also exemplars of sustainability.

“This Government is proud to back decarbonisation, be it in schools or in industry and this commitment comes just weeks after I announced the 15 more projects we’re supporting to help big businesses move away from fossil fuels in their production processes,” Megan Woods said.

Other co-funding announced today will enable the replacement of additional fossil-fuelled boilers across the Health, and Tertiary Education sectors, and a further 12 fleet electrification projects in the State sector. The investment will bring the total number of EVs co-funded since the fund’s establishment to 978.

 

Further information

A total of $22.92 million has been allocated to 19 new decarbonisation projects across the State Sector, including fleet electrification, lighting upgrades, boiler replacements and heat recovery projects.

The full list of projects announced today are:

  • Ministry of Education (MOE) - $10.000 million to replace all remaining coal boilers in primary and secondary schools (further detail provided below). MOE will invest $10.000 million from its own budget. We estimate that this will reduce carbon emissions by around 35,400 tonnes over 10 years (around 3,540 tonnes per annum on average over ten years).
  • Kāinga Ora - $3.787 million to to purchase electric vehicles and install charging infrastructure (141 vehicles). Kāinga Ora will invest $4.909 million from its own budget. We estimate that this will reduce carbon emissions by around 2,999 tonnes over 10 years (around 299.9 tonnes per annum on average over 10 years).
  • Ministry of Social Development - $3.370 million to purchase electric vehicles and install charging infrastructure (109 vehicles). The Ministry of Social Development will invest $4.120 million from its own budget. We estimate that this will reduce carbon emissions by around 1,688 tonnes over 10 years (around 168.8 tonnes per annum on average over 10 years).
  • New Zealand Police - $1.700 million to purchase 45 electric vehicles and install charging infrastructure. New Zealand Police will invest $1.700 million from its own budget. We estimate that this will reduce carbon emissions by around 1,761 tonnes over ten years (around 176.1 tonnes per annum on average over ten years).
  • Kāinga Ora - $0.921 million to purchase 28 electric vehicles and install charging infrastructure. Kāinga Ora will invest $1.073 million from its own budget. We that this will reduce carbon emissions by around 416 tonnes over ten years (around 41.6 tonnes per annum on average over ten years).
  • Department of Corrections - $0.676 million to purchase 24 electric vehicles and install charging infrastructure. The Department of Corrections will invest $0.748 million from its own budget. We estimate that this will reduce carbon emissions by around 362 tonnes over ten years (around 36.2 tonnes per annum on average over ten years).
  • Bay of Plenty DHB - $0.631 million to purchase 20 electric vehicles and install charging infrastructure. Bay of Plenty DHB will invest $0.631 million from its own budget. We estimate that this will reduce carbon emissions by around 878 tonnes over ten years (around 87.8 tonnes per annum on average over ten years).
  • WorkSafe New Zealand - $0.561 million to purchase electric vehicles (18 vehicles) and install charging infrastructure. WorkSafe New Zealand will invest $0.602 million from its own budget. We estimate that this will reduce carbon emissions by around 400 tonnes over 10 years (around 40 tonnes per annum on average over 10 years).
  • New Zealand Police - $0.380 million to replace a heating and cooling system at Papakura Police Station with a renewable low-carbon option. New Zealand Police will invest $0.380 million from its own budget. We estimate that this will reduce carbon emissions by around 767 tonnes over ten years (around 76.7 tonnes per annum on average over ten years).
  • Capital & Coast DHB - $0.365 million to install a heat recovery system in the Main Hospital building at Wellington Hospital. Capital & Coast DHB will invest $0.547 million from its own budget. We estimate that this will reduce carbon emissions by around 3,810 tonnes over ten years (around 381 tonnes per annum on average over ten years).
  • Southern DHB - $0.120 million to convert a diesel boiler to a heat pump in the Mental Health Unit at Dunstan Hospital. Southern DHB will invest $0.180 million from its own budget. We estimate that this will reduce carbon emissions by around 323 tonnes over ten years (around 32.3 tonnes per annum on average over ten years).
  • University of Waikato - $0.080 million to replace two gas boilers at a Student Village in Hamilton. University of Waikato will invest $0.096 million from its own budget. We estimate that this will reduce carbon emissions by around 86 tonnes over ten years (around 8.6 tonnes per annum on average over ten years).
  • Television New Zealand - $0.057 million to purchase electric vehicles and install charging infrastructure (2 vehicles). Television New Zealand will invest $0.057 million from its own budget. We estimate that this will reduce carbon emissions by around 69 tonnes over 10 years (around 6.9 tonnes per annum on average over 10 years).
  • Lincoln University - $0.057 million to purchase two electric vehicles and install charging infrastructure. Lincoln University will invest $0.057 million from its own budget. We estimate that this will reduce carbon emissions by around 59 tonnes over ten years (around 5.9 tonnes per annum on average over ten years).
  • Landcare Research New Zealand - $0.056 million to purchase electric vehicles and install charging infrastructure (2 vehicles). Landcare Research New Zealand will invest $0.056 million from its own budget. We estimate that this will reduce carbon emissions by around 45 tonnes over 10 years (around 4.5 tonnes per annum on average over 10 years).
  • MidCentral DHB - $0.048 million to install efficient lighting at Palmerston North Hospital. MidCentral DHB will invest $0.143 million from its own budget. We estimate that this will reduce carbon emissions by around 65 tonnes over ten years (around 6.5 tonnes per annum on average over ten years).
  • Ministry of Social Development - $0.046 million to purchase two electric vehicles. The Ministry of Social Development will invest $0.046 million from its own budget. We estimate that this will reduce carbon emissions by around 56 tonnes over ten years (around 5.6 tonnes per annum on average over ten years).
  • Wairarapa DHB - $0.045 million to purchase two electric vehicles. Wairarapa DHB will invest $0.045 million from its own budget. We estimate that this will reduce carbon emissions by around 47 tonnes over ten years (around 4.7 tonnes per annum on average over ten years).
  • Northland Polytechnic - $0.023 million to install efficient lighting. EECA will provide Northland Polytechnic with $0.068 million in Crown Loan funding to cover remaining project costs. We estimate that this will reduce carbon emissions by around 63 tonnes over ten years (around 6.3 tonnes per annum on average over ten years) and save approximately $14,020 in energy costs per annum.

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