Our wild places, plants, and animals are taonga to be cherished and protected.

The Department of Conservation (DOC) should be well funded to protect and advocate for nature

  • All threatened species should have a recovery plan in place.
  • DOC’s core capacity should be improved by hiring and training more scientific and technical staff, field workers, rangers, educational officers, and locally based volunteer initiatives.
  • DOC’s capacity to work constructively with tangata whenua should be improved.
  • Government should purchase and protect land that’s under threat through increased funding for the Natural Heritage Fund.

Conservation is not just about the conservation estate

  • Landowners should be supported to undertake conservation activities including restoration of native vegetation, streams, and wetlands, and establishing habitat corridors.
  • Conservation planning should extend to the entire natural environment. The National Policy Statement on indigenous biodiversity should provide clear direction to councils.
  • The conservation potential of islands should be enhanced, and mainland conservation “islands” created.

Conservation operates within te Tiriti o Waitangi

  • Co-governance and other power sharing arrangements should be encouraged.
  • Conservation land of significant value to iwi and hapu should be returned.
  • Customary use within the conservation estate should be allowed.

Pests should be controlled and eradicated where possible

  • DOC should retain primary responsibility for pest control on conservation land.
  • Community and tangata whenua involvement should be encouraged, in addition to professional and publicly funded efforts.
  • Government should promote, support, and fund ground-based methods of pest control by a properly trained workforce in preference to aerial poisoning. We should aspire to a minimum use of poisons until feasible to stop all use.

Public access and tourism is important

  • Walking access along waterways should be protected and paper roads remain open.
  • Government should support the work of the Walking Access Commission.
  • Overseas tourists should be levied, with revenue funding conservation work. Strategies should be in place to reduce the impact of tourist numbers in the conservation estate.

The health of natural areas must not be compromised by economic activity

  • The export of indigenous timbers and timber products should remain banned, and harvesting of windblown tress prohibited. Planting of indigenous forest outside the conservation estate specifically for harvest should be permitted.
  • Grazing concessions on conservation land should be phased out, except where they protect ecological values such as light sheep grazing to control weeds.
  • Guidelines should be in place for the farming of pest species (deer, goats, etc) to avoid escapees establishing new wild populations.
DOWNLOAD FULL POLICY

Latest Conservation Announcements

Story

NZ’s most prestigious conservation award – Loder Cup presented to Graeme Atkins

The Minister of Conservation Minister, Eugenie Sage, today presented Aotearoa New Zealand’s most prestigious conservation award, the Loder Cup, to ...
Read More

Story

New pest lures to protect nature

The Department of Conservation (DOC) is investing $1.4 million to develop new predator lures that would be game-changers for trapping and surveilla...
Read More

Thriving Oceans

Oceans are the lifeblood of our planet and home to thousands of taonga species, providing us with nourishing food to feed our families, supporting ...
Read More

Story

Greens to protect Aotearoa’s oceans with marine sanctuaries, bottom trawling and set-netting restrictions, and action against plastic

The Green Party has released its Thriving Oceans Plan, which would dramatically increase marine protected areas and ban bottom trawling on seamounts. 
Read More

Story

New tools to make nature more accessible

People planning to head outdoors now have a resource that lets them know how accessible an area is for people with varying levels of mobility, Mini...
Read More

Story

More resources for kiwi conservation

New Zealand’s goal of 100,000 kiwi by 2030 is being helped by an extra $19.7 million in funding to accelerate iwi and community efforts to protect ...
Read More